Sep 01

School Bus Safety

While riding a school bus is still the safest transportation for kids to and from school, many injuries still occur due to a lack of care on the part of other drivers.  According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), an average of 139 school transportation-related deaths occur every year with the majority of victims being occupants in other vehicles or individuals walking or biking near buses.

Consumer Reports advises drivers should be extra cautious during school pick-up and drop-off hours and offers several tips to help ensure the safety of school children and others on the road:

  • Never pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children. It is illegal in all 50 states. Also, never pass a school bus on the right — it is illegal and dangerous.
  • If you are traveling in the same direction as a stopped school bus, you must stop as well.
  • Yellow flashing lights indicate that the bus is preparing to stop to pickup or drop off children. If you are driving, slow down and prepare to stop. Red flashing lights and an extended stop arm indicate that the bus is stopped, and that children are getting on or off. This, of course, means that you have to stop as well.
  • When waiting with your own child, teach them to wait until the stop arm is fully extended and the bus door opens before moving toward the bus.
  • The area ten feet around a school bus is at the highest risk for child being hit, so stop your car further than that to allow space for children to enter or exit. Most states have distance requirements, and they may be much further away than you may think.
  • When backing out of a driveway or leaving a garage, watch out for children walking or bicycling to school. Better yet, walk around your car or out to the sidewalk to check for any children walking in your path before you get in.
  • Be aware that roads that pass close schools may have slower speed limits during arrival and dismissal times than during non-school hours and that those limits are often more strictly enforced.
  • Drive slowly and watch for children walking in the street, especially if there are no sidewalks. Also be aware of children playing or waiting around bus stops.
  • Be alert and aware on the road. While children are typically taught about looking both ways, they could dart into the street without looking if they are late or distracted.

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